Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Purchasing: Marketing's Secret Weapon?

Should the Marketing or the Communications Department step in and prevent you from speaking to trade publications?

Or could sharing your purchasing success story help the company actually increase its sales?

Those are a few of the issues that I rant about in this new vlog:



To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certfication Online At
http://www.nextlevelpurchasing.com/

Monday, September 29, 2008

SPSM program called "the most current and world-class supply management course"

With the current economic situation, it seems like every purchasing department is struggling to achieve measurable benefit for their organizations. Everyone is looking for some tactic, stratetgy, or service that can make a positive difference. In light of that, I just thought that I'd share this feedback from a recently certified SPSM, who gave us permission to publish his comments.


Purchasing Courses - Online Courses From Next Level Purchasing
"Next Level Purchasing's Senior Professional in Supply Management® Program is undoubtedly the most current and world-class supply management course available for purchasing professionals . The course content is practical and has helped me already to deliver measurable results and savings for my brand. I would highly recommend the SPSM® Certification for purchasing professionals who would like a rewarding career and want to pursue the highest recognition in the field of supply management."

Omar Shabir Qazi, SPSM
Buyer
Dubai, United Arab Emirates

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Friday, September 26, 2008

The Supply Risk You Need To Address Before Leaving The Office Today

Wednesday night, President Bush warned of the possibility of a "long and painful recession" if government doesn't step in to save the US financial system. While many observers wrote off this threat as another of Bush's "weapons of mass destruction" scare tactics, yesterday's failure of Washington Mutual - the largest bank failure in US history - underscores the fact that these are serious times.

Now, what does that have to do with purchasing?

A lot.

You see, your suppliers have a significant portion of their cash in banks. So what happens if the banks fail?

The FDIC insures only $100,000 per depositor (including corporations) per insured bank.

What if a supplier of yours had all of its cash in one bank and that bank failed?

Yep, your supplier would only be guaranteed to recover $100,000 of it.

Could your most strategic suppliers stay in business with only $100,000 left? How long would that last them? How many employees - including employees that work on producing goods for, or providing services to, you - would be laid off immediately?

Nervous yet?

You should be.

I suggest getting on the phone today with the top management of your strategic suppliers to understand how diversified their deposits are. If all their banks failed today, what percentage of their cash would be preserved?

What is your plan if more Washington Mutual-type failures occur and impact your suppliers?

You should be thinking about it.

I have the feeling that the government legislators will agree on a rescue package before the stock market closes today. But there is a chance they may not.

Supply risk management is all about being prepared for such chances.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Thursday, September 25, 2008

LCCS and Cultural Considerations

Today I’d like to welcome Harco Bouwman, Co-Founder of Buyers Meeting Point, who is sharing a guest post on the cultural aspects of low cost country sourcing.

In today’s business environment, organizations are forced by competitive pressure and high labor rates to working more and more globally in areas that they may not have done before. Even people who speak the same language often misunderstand each other.

Unfortunately, there is an even greater potential for Chinese and Westerners to misunderstand each other due to different cultural and business practices. In my travels to Asia, I have learned a few key areas that have helped in my professional interactions.

In order to understand why that occurs, it is important to know the way people in the two cultures think. This table outlines a few of the differences.








ValueWest
(US and Most European)
East
(Chinese and most Asian)
Communication of InformationMore meaning is in the explicit, verbal message. Use of direct languageMeaning is often implied or must be inferred. Use of indirect language patterns
The IndividualHas to have rights and greater need for
autonomy and individual achievement
Group duty, preservation of harmony
Conflict ResolutionTrial or confrontation, use of lawyers and courtsMore mediation though trusted third parties


There are many aspects of the interactions between two individuals. The ones listed above are just a sampling. Our hope is that this information is helpful in the professional dealings between cultures. For more information around this topic, please visit our forum or procurement solutions area.

I encourage you to continue to understand your clients and their backgrounds. It should make for a more rewarding relationship and overall partnership.

Disclosure: Buyers Meeting Point is a sponsor of the Purchasing Certification Blog and a global community hosted for procurement professionals. The company is based in Amsterdam, The Netherlands with a subsidiary in the United States, located in Boston. You can visit Buyers Meeting Point on the Web at http://www.buyersmeetingpoint.com.

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Whitepaper Wednesday - Spend Analysis

Welcome to another edition of Whitepaper Wednesday here on the Purchasing Certification Blog. The whitepaper I'll be discussing today is "Spend Analysis: Working Too Hard For The Money," which is authored by Aberdeen and sponsored by Iasta.

This whitepaper assumes that the reader is already familiar with the basics of spend analysis. It is designed to help the reader understand the quantifiable benefits of spend analysis and to help anyone trying to build a business case for implementing a spend analysis solution. The benchmarks and metrics that the whitepaper cites are quite interesting, for example:

  • Spend under management improved to 62% from 46% for organizations that implemented spend analysis solutions and that "by improving spend under management, enterprises are able to...ultimately deliver an incremental increase in cost savings."
  • The average savings from strategic sourcing efforts credited to spend analysis initiatives nearly doubled.
  • "Spend analysis reporting can be leveraged by procurement professionals to identify purchases made with suppliers not contracted, leading to corrective action and subsequent modification of behavior...The average incremental increase in contract compliance was 34% (or from 44% to 59%)."

In general, the whitepaper does a great job of not so much saying that spend analysis is a silver bullet for success, but by demonstrating why it is an important component of a procurement performance improvement strategy.

You can obtain your own copy of this whitepaper via Iasta's Web site.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Friday, September 19, 2008

Getting Started With A Procurement Transformation

I hope that you have enjoyed the article "10 Step Procurement Transformation, Part I." Part II is due to come out in about six weeks with a couple of PurchTips articles on other topics in the interim.

In step 1 - Define the Scope of the Procurement Transformation - I asked: "What is going to be different a year from now? Your organizational structure? The technology used? The supply base? What else?"

Let me use this blog post to give you some additional ideas on "what else" you should be evaluating as part of your procurement transformation efforts:
  • Policies
  • Procedures
  • Size of staff
  • Staff members
  • Degree of centralization/decentralization
  • Goals
  • Support from other departments (e.g., Legal)
  • The stage in which Procurement gets involved in the design cycle
  • Who Procurement reports to
  • Purchasing job descriptions
  • Outside support (e.g., consultants, benchmarking firms, BPO, etc.)
  • Degree of globalization
And these additional variables are still but a few of the many possibilities.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Thursday, September 18, 2008

Turn The Other Cheek? Not When It's A Supplier Slapping You!

At the local purchasing association meeting on Tuesday, I had a fascinating conversation with a colleague who was struggling with a supplier situation.

You see, she had a contract in place with a supplier and that contract included a well-thought-out price adjustment provision. However, the supplier had recently been acquired by a bigger player in the industry. The "new" supplier said that the contract was null and void since the "original" supplier no longer existed. Furthermore, the supplier said that it was increasing its prices by 20% even though a month earlier the price just went up by 7% in accordance with the price adjustment provision.

Excuse me for a second while I find my blood pressure medication...

...OK, thanks, I'm back.

Of course, my colleague asked me "What should I do?" and she explained how she pleaded with the supplier to no avail. Here's a summary of what I told her.

1. Never, EVER act subservient to a supplier. In this case, I wouldn't be begging the supplier not to do what they threatened to do. I would simply say "That's not happening." By begging the supplier not to follow through, you are essentially giving them power. You are implicitly acknowledging that the decision is theirs to make and that they can elect to "show mercy" or not. In these types of situations, I've said things like "It's such a coincidence that you brought up the price issue. We've recently decided here that the price needs to go down, plus we need to stretch our payment terms from 30 days to 45 days, and we need you to reduce your lead time from 8 weeks to 6 weeks. We were thinking that these changes would go into effect October 1 but may be able to hold off until November 1. By which date would you be prepared to implement these changes - October 1 or November 1?" Now, of course, we didn't implement these changes. But the price didn't go up either and the supplier knew "who was boss."

2. Most well-written contracts have an "assignment" provision saying that, when a successor acquires the supplier, the successor also acquires its contractual obligations. In fact, acquisition of contractual obligations is law in probably most of the world. If the contract had an assignment provision, this should be shown to the supplier as ammunition.

3. Most well-written contracts have a "dispute resolution" provision where the parties agree to arbitration or mediation in the event of a dispute. This is the time where I would be insisting that we arbitrate/mediate immediately.

4. Not honoring a contractual obligation is a serious matter. You can never have the type of modern, collaborative supplier relationships necessary if your suppliers do not honor their obligations. So, I would source soon. If this is not a high spend category, I may not drop my other priorities to source this week or this month, but it would be on my near-term radar. Even if the incumbent ended up being the lowest priced or highest ranking bidder, I would think twice about awarding the business to them. If their contractual price structure can't be relied upon, it's time to look at the other fish in the sea. A supplier's proposal can only save you money if they actually honor the price and the price adjustment scheme that they agreed upon.

NOTE: If you aren't familiar with price adjustment, assignment, and dispute resolution provisions, the online class "Supply Management Contract Writing" can help you learn how to apply them to your work.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Wednesday, September 17, 2008

Whitepaper Wednesday: End-To-End eProcurement

Well, it's Wednesday again and that means another review of, and link to, a free supply chain whitepaper.

Unlike the first two Whitepaper Wednesday posts, which highlighted Next Level Purchasing whitepapers, today's featured whitepaper comes from Sourcing Innovation and Emporion. It is called "Integrated End-To-End eProcurement: The Foundation For Spend Management Success."

This whitepaper begins with a quick review of the basics of what eProcurement is and is not. It then defines "end-to-end eProcurement" and discusses the benefits of integrating what some organizations treat as separate parts of the procurement process.

While there is no shortage of focus on the technical aspects of eProcurement, there were some interesting nuggets of advice for successfully implementing eProcurement systems and driving adoption, such as:

  • "Understand the drivers for change...Make sure there is a clear understanding of the inefficiencies, costs, and problems the organization is currently facing, as well as the improvements the system will bring."
  • "Re-engineer business processes with cross-functional teams...because the processes need to work for all affected parties, not just the day-to-day purchasing team or accounts payable organization. In addition, it's the best way to make sure colleagues throughout the organization understand the system and the benefits it can bring."
  • "The best way to insure the system gets used is to convince management to base part of everyone's performance evaluation, and the criteria for bonuses and raises, on procurement system utilization metrics."

It's a pretty extensive whitepaper and I can't cover the whole thing, but you can download your own copy here.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Monday, September 15, 2008

My Negotiation Rule of Thumb...(Well, One of Them)

I often get questions about the ethics of negotiating with one or just a select number of bidders after receiving proposals. Should all bidders be given the opportunity to negotiate?

Well, here's my rule of thumb.

I create and continuously maintain a ranking of best bidders at the post-proposal stage of the sourcing process. Whether that ranking is based on price alone or a combination of criteria, I always have it. And my personal rule is to not give a negotiating opportunity to someone without giving the same opportunity to all HIGHER ranked bidders.

So, if you have seven bidders and want to negotiate with the bidder that has the third best rank, the bidders ranked #1 and #2 should also be given the opportunity to "sharpen their pencils." I wouldn't worry about the lower-ranked bidders unless I think that they also have a legitimate shot at actually earning the business. Usually, at that point, I've already ruled them out.

Now, if I negotiated with the third-best bidder and, as a result, got "the best deal" and never gave bidders 1 and 2 an equal opportunity to revise their proposals, that would reek of poor ethical judgment.

One thing about this approach is how it might be abused by the suppliers that you frequently engage in sourcing processes. If they know from experience that they don't have to put their best proposal forward because they will have the opportunity to negotiate later, you may find your sourcing process becoming more complex and less efficient than it needs to be.

You also have to do a self-evaluation and ask yourself "Why am I negotiating with someone other than the top two bidders?" In some cases, it may be due to internal political pressure to keep the incumbent.

Using the competitive bidding process to simply lower the incumbent's price without any realistic chance of actually switching suppliers is unethical. So you need to employ some change management to shape the culture of your organization while also keeping the process fair.

Shameless plug: you can learn more about negotiating effectively in our online class "Powerful Negotiation For Successful Buying."

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Friday, September 12, 2008

APICS Conference Next Week...Who's Going?

Sunday will mark the beginning of the APICS 2008 International Conference & Expo in Kansas City, Missouri.

Next Level Purchasing will have a booth there. I personally will not be there but, if you're there, stop by the booth and say hello to Michael and Megan. They have a few resources to hand out and will be happy to answer any questions you may have about benchmarking your purchasing team or kickstarting your purchasing and supply management career.

And, oh yeah, they are giving away an iPod containing the SPSM® Multimedia Study & Implementation Guide to one lucky winner! So be sure to drop off your business card and get in the drawing.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Thursday, September 11, 2008

What Purchasing System Did Casio America Select?

You may recall my post from late July in which I reported on Bellwether Software introducing a new Web-based version of their purchasing software, ePMX. It appears that this new system is gaining some early traction with a couple of early customer wins reported in their latest press release.

I've pasted the press release below for your reading pleasure. In full disclosure, Bellwether is a sponsor of the Purchasing Certification Blog. They offer a free "Purchasing Automation Evaluation Guide" that you can obtain by clicking here.


Press Release

Bellwether Software
Louisville, KY
August 5, 2008

City of Seward, AK chooses Bellwether’s Purchasing Management eXtra (ePMX) for its ease of use and affordability!

Bellwether Software, a leader in E-procurement solutions for companies of all sizes, recently announced its roll out of e-PMX, its new Web-based Procurement software, is showing early signs of success with the addition of two new customers: City of Seward (AK) and Casio America, Inc.

City of Seward, Alaska is the local municipal government for Seward, Alaska. Seward was incorporated in 1912 and is a home-rule city located within the Kenai Peninsula Borough. The City of Seward offers its population of 2,600 residents a 24-hour police department, fire department, library, hospital, public works, boat harbor, community development, engineering and building, parks & recreation, youth center, water/wastewater and electric utility. Seward is the gateway to the Kenai Fjords National Park and was named the all American city in 1963, 1965 and 2005.

Casio, America, Inc. Dover, NJ is the U.S. subsidiary of Casio Computer Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan, one of the world’s leading manufacturers of consumer electronics and business equipment solutions, established in 1957. Casio, Inc. markets calculators, keyboards, digital cameras, mobile presentation devices, disc titles and label printers, watches, cash registers and other consumer electronics products. Casio has strived to realize the corporate creed of “creativity and contribution” through the introduction of innovative and imaginative products.

Questions and inquiries should be directed to
sales@bellwethercorp.com or to 502-426-5463. Visit Bellwether’s website at www.bellwethercorp.com.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Wednesday, September 10, 2008

Whitepaper Wednesday - Developing Purchasing Teams

Welcome to the second Whitepaper Wednesday on the Purchasing Certification Blog. Today's free whitepaper is from Next Level Purchasing and is entitled "The Purchasing Leader's Guide To A More Successful Team."

This whitepaper will teach you:

  • The seven steps associated with developing your team's skills in order to get better results
  • The three methods of assessing your team's skills
  • The five common methods of prioritizing professional development
  • An approach that can lead to improved perception of the purchasing team and its leader as well as to higher morale of the team
  • Strategies for measuring and sustaining improvements

The whitepaper is FREE. Click here to register to receive "The Purchasing Leader's Guide To A More Successful Team."

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Monday, September 08, 2008

Negotiating By Phone

I hope that you have enjoyed the article "4 Rules For Negotiating By Phone."

Negotiation is one of my favorite topics to write about. If you're interested in learning more about negotiation, I have links to all my negotiation articles on my delicious account under the "negotiation" tag. Click here for links to my negotiation articles on delicious.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Friday, September 05, 2008

Supply & Demand Chain Executive Podcast Featuring Next Level Purchasing

Supply & Demand Chain Executive just released a new podcast entitled "New Supply Management Skills for the Today's Supply Chain Challenges" featuring yours truly. I highly suggest that you give this less-than-20-minute interview between me and SDCE editor Andy Reese so that you can learn:

  • What I view as the major changes and challenges affecting the purchasing & supply management field
  • What is preventing purchasing & supply management organizations from breezing through those challenges
  • Several strategies that successful companies are employing to deal with the new challenges
  • How having a team enrolled in a purchasing certification program can play a role in achieving better results

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Thursday, September 04, 2008

Reverse Auctions STILL Controversial? Come On!

A recent Spend Matters post alerted me to a CAPS Research study (free registration required) that indicated that eAuction usage had declined to an average of 2.58% of total spend in 2007 from 3.24% in 2005.

An article in the Go Pro (Government Procurement) magazine I received today, touted the growth of eAuction usage among government agencies buying electricity and other energy commodities.

I was alerted to a recent article in Printing Impressions magazine whose title says it all about the tone of the article: "The Fading Reverse Auction." This article references a survey that indicated that 85% of print buyers are not using reverse auctions and 48% of print suppliers say that none of their customers are using reverse auctions.

So, are reverse auctions growing? Declining? Both? Neither? What's the reason for the change if there is one? Does the reverse auction still have value or is it going to be the dinosaur of tomorrow?

Here is my impression...

Reverse auction usage, and its appropriateness, is tied to economic conditions.

When the economy is growing, prices are rising, and supplier capacity is filling up, some suppliers can afford to pick and choose their customers and can decline opportunities to bid if they dislike the bidding mechanism (i.e., the reverse auction format). When the economy is in a recession, prices fall, and suppliers are eager to fill their capacity to keep their workforce employed and to stay in business. They can't be choosy with what opportunities they are presented with.

So when the economy is bad, reverse auctions are good for buyers because they maximize the competitive forces that drive prices down. When the economy is good, reverse auctions need to be considered more carefully.

Note that I didn't say "reverse auctions are bad."

That's because they still can work in good economic times. You just have to evaluate the impact on competition. If you have a significant percentage of suppliers declining to bid because they do not like the format, conducting a reverse auction can effectively reduce overall competition although the competitive forces at work for those suppliers that do participate are still maximized.

This perspective is a natural extension of the thoughts I expressed on this topic in my 2004 articles "eSourcing & Supplier Relationships, Part I" and "eSourcing & Supplier Relationships, Part II."

What concerns me is that people who misuse reverse auctions blame the auction and not the person. There are too many examples of such in the Printing Impressions article.

One print buyer was quoted as saying "“We only did a reverse auction once, and we’ll never do it again. With a reverse auction bid, you get what you pay for—but if you vary from the bid, you will get charged handsomely."

This is Purchasing 101. If you do any RFP - auctioned or not - you need to request pricing for work that goes outside of the specification. Don't leave that to chance. So is it the auction or the skills of the buyer that caused the problem here?

And, wait. Isn't "We tried that once and it didn't work" supposed to be one of the excuses that purchasing and supply management teams try to fight when working with internal departments? It's one of the worst excuses in business.

If something didn't work, figure out why it didn't and fix it. That's how you learn and improve.

That buyer went on to say "Reverse auctions are only good if you absolutely need to have rock-bottom prices and can sacrifice quality and service."

That is simply an untrue statement.

In our class "Expert Purchasing Management," we list "10 Keys To eSourcing Success." #6 is "Invite Only Suppliers To Whom You Would Want To Award Your Business." Why would you invite suppliers who have unacceptable quality and service? Again, is it the auction or the skills of the buyer that is at fault?

The buyer goes on to say "We have found, even with due diligence, reverse auctions can drive down the price, but then you get nickel-and-dimed in production. In printing, there are many variances that cannot always be outlined in the initial specifications.”

But wouldn't the specifications be the same whether you got your proposals via a reverse auction or via an envelope? So, you'd still be paying over-and-aboves either way, right?

Uh, huh.

The Printing Impressions article was overly-biased in my biased opinion. The article ranted about the evil reverse auction, but explored little contrary perspective. At the very end, the author noted that "I am not suggesting that all buying companies are against reverse auctions. While the majority of print buyers don’t support them, 15 percent of our May Quick Poll respondents found them to be effective."

The author quoted another print buyer as saying “We use reverse auctions regularly. We find that they’re very useful when your commodity is well-defined, when there are six or more pre-qualified bidders, and when all bidders understand that the bid will be awarded at the end of the reverse auction (so they must give their best and final price at that time).”

So 15% are successful and 85% are unsuccessful. That calls to mind the Pareto Principle and sounds pretty typical of success in business. A small number of people account for a large percentage of the success. So why not interview the successful 15%, learn the secrets to their success, and help the majority of people who are struggling?

Sounds like the suppliers make the rules in the printing industry and most of the buyers are unnecessarily at their mercy.

What's wrong with this picture?

Reverse auctions are a tool. They are not a replacement for smart buyers. Like any tool, they can be misused by a less-than-fully-educated user.



Don't hurt yourself.


To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Wednesday, September 03, 2008

Whitepaper Wednesday - Purchasing Job Descriptions

Welcome to the first Whitepaper Wednesday here on the Purchasing Certification Blog. For the next several Wednesdays, I will be linking you to some whitepapers that I feel are particularly valuable for succeeding in today's purchasing and supply management world.

The first featured whitepaper is called "Are Your Purchasing Job Descriptions Outdated?"

Change is rapid in the purchasing and supply management field of today. Therefore, updating job descriptions regularly is a must. In fact, I can guarantee you that if you have not updated your organization's job descriptions in the last five years, they are woefully outdated!

Why is it so bad to have outdated purchasing job descriptions?

Well, according to the whitepaper: "There are two severe consequences of using outdated purchasing job descriptions. First, outdated purchasing job descriptions can result in the recruiting of new team members who may possess the skills necessary for succeeding in purchasing in previous years, but not the skills necessary for success today. Second, outdated purchasing job descriptions can also set too low the standard skill levels to which a company’s existing purchasing professionals aspire."

The whitepaper goes on to discuss changes in the purchasing certification field that you may have missed if you haven't actively kept up. It shares some valuable statistics on the percentage of purchasing professionals with bachelor's and associate's degrees that need to be taken into careful consideration when recruiting. And it also gives you three tips for re-evaluating your job descriptions.

"Are Your Purchasing Job Descriptions Outdated?" is FREE and there is no registration required. So why not download it right now?

Click here to access "Are Your Purchasing Job Descriptions Outdated?"

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Tuesday, September 02, 2008

SPSM Update & Whitepaper Plans

As is customary for my first post of the month, I'll share that the SPSM® continued its expansion into new countries with the first SPSM® Certification being awarded in Egypt in August.

In addition, I wanted to tell you about a new feature we'll be trying out here on the Purchasing Certification Blog. With tomorrow's post, we'll be launching "Whitepaper Wednesdays" here.

Every Wednesday, we'll post a link to a whitepaper. Some will be from Next Level Purchasing. Some will be from other sources. But all will be relevant and valuable to purchasing and supply management professionals.

So be sure to check back tomorrow for the first Whitepaper Wednesday!

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

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