Friday, November 27, 2009

Holiday Weeks: A Great Time For Procurement To Step Up Its Game

We have had a very busy week here at Next Level Purchasing despite - or, maybe, because of - it being a holiday week. We have had a high number of enrollments in our online purchasing training classes this week.

And that got me thinking...holiday weeks are usually a little slower in a procurement department. Large numbers of internal customers have taken vacation days. Suppliers have plant shutdowns. Management isn't breathing down your neck the way they do most weeks.

So, like the students who have enrolled with us this week, it is a great time to get stuff done that you've been putting off! You know, those more strategic projects that have fallen victim to the tactical fire-fighting that you do most days. Days like today make for a great opportunity to catch up and knock off some things from that ever-growing to-do list.

So, don't waste quieter days like today working at a slower pace or surfing the Internet. Make wonderful, uninterrupted progress!

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Whitepaper Wednesday - Energy Buying

Welcome to another installment of Whitepaper Wednesday here on the Purchasing Certification Blog. Today, I'll be reviewing a whitepaper entitled "However You Slice It, Buying Energy Is Unique" from Summit Energy and Purchasing Magazine.

The simple premise of this whitepaper is to demonstrate that energy is a commodity unlike others and, therefore, the procurement of it should be approached differently. It bases this argument on five key differences, represented in five discreet sections of the document.

Difference #1 - Geography Matters. This section is packed with quotes from energy buyers who attest that regulations in different states complicate the buying of energy and that one has to be familiar with each market in order to optimally identify the right approach in each market.

Difference #2 - Volatile Pricing and Tight Timing. While commodity buyers certainly understand the roller-coaster-like nature of commodity prices, this whitepaper tries to establish that the timing of energy purchases is among the tightest of any commodity, with pricing validity often measured in hours.

Difference #3 - Necessity of Market Intelligence. While I would argue that market intelligence is necessary for any commodity, this section points out that some activities like being familiar with regulations that differ by location and keeping track of pending legislation are employed with energy buying but not with other commodities.

Difference #4 - Not Just Aggregation. Having never been responsible for multi-site energy acquisition, I found these excerpts from this section to be rather interesting: "Even if multiple sites can aggregate their buy from a single supplier, they may get better rates by going it alone. For example, one site may reside within a business unit of the parent company and not secure credit terms as favorable as the other site. Many factors can drive contract preference, and all too often, procurement professionals too quickly assume that aggregating volume is the most effective tool in the shed. In addition to the size of your load, the shape of your load can drastically impact pricing. The time of day when a facility requires the most energy and its pattern of use can significantly impact the site’s utility rate, contract terms or price offerings."

Difference #5 - Measures of Success. Because the market prices for energy change frequently, one cannot expect energy costs to go down year-over-year for any significant duration of time. That makes reporting traditional cost savings difficult. David Bush, the CEO of procurement solution provider and Purchasing Certification Blog sponsor Iasta, was quoted in this section as saying “It’s hard to pin down cost savings with energy...You look at what you would have paid if you hadn’t acted versus what you did pay.” The whitepaper concludes this section by saying sometimes cost savings plays second fiddle to actually having predictable costs, which pleases investors.

I've always found learning about new categories - including those that I was not likely to purchase in the near future - to be fascinating and helpful in my development as a purchasing professional. If you're like me, you'll probably enjoy reading this whitepaper. You can download your own copy from Purchasing Magazine's Web site (registration required).

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Does Certification Matter In Purchasing Salaries?

Every year, Purchasing Magazine conducts its widely-watched purchasing salary survey. This year's results aren't available yet, but editor Susan Avery gave everyone a sneak preview of the results in a post on their social networking site, PurchasingBizConnect.

In this post, Susan reveals that the three certifications included on the survey definitely mattered when it comes to earning power in the purchasing field. Susan writes that purchasing professionals who have earned the SPSM® Certification earn 7.7% more than purchasing professionals who have not.

Even the certification with the lowest salary differential - the CPIM with a 5.6% premium - was still very healthy. With such a direct financial benefit of certification and the low cost to actually become certified, it leaves me wondering why every single purchasing professional in the world doesn't pursue a certification.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Monday, November 23, 2009

When Job Hunting, It’s The Little Things That Kill You, Part II

Earlier this month, I posted Part I of this series in which I indicated that a common reason job applicants don't get to the next step of the hiring process is that they fail to write well in their communication with the employer. Today, I'll point out that another reason that job applicants fall short is that they fail to read well.

I can hear it now: "Wait a second, Charles. You mean that basic reading and writing abilities hurt professional candidates?"

Yes, they do. If you can read and write well, you have an advantage over a lot of other candidates.

It's unbelievable, but it's true. Some people really paid attention in elementary school and others didn't.

Did you ever hear someone say "There's no such thing as a dumb question?"

Well, let me tell you: there IS such a thing as a dumb question when you are applying for a job.

If you ask the employer a question where the answer to that question can be found in the job advertisement that you are responding to, the employer is going to assume that you don't have basic reading skills. For example, if you ask what the qualifications are for a job and the qualifications are specified in the job advertisement that you are responding to, you've pretty much killed your chances of getting that job.

So, before beginning communications related to a job that you are pursuing, try to let the job advertisement answer your questions. Then, only ask questions that the employer has not already provided the answers to.

Oh, and one other thing: make sure that the job title you reference in your cover letter exactly matches the job title in the advertisement. If the advertisement refers to the position as "Senior Sourcing Manager," do not say that you wish to be considered for the "Procurement Manager" position or any other variation of the job title. Doing so will only lead the employer to conclude that you cannot read.

So, the lesson of Part I is learn to write. The lesson of Part II is learn to read.

Simple enough, right? Part III coming soon...

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Thursday, November 19, 2009

The Costco/Coca-Cola Standoff: The Risk For Costco

Yesterday, I reported that Costco is playing hardball with Coca-Cola Co. in its latest price negotiations, cutting off its orders for Coke products and publicizing the fact that Coca-Cola isn't as flexible with pricing as Costco feels its members deserve.

I brought this topic up in an executive breakfast I attended with about a dozen or so procurement execs this morning. A sentiment among those in the room was disbelief. Many folks said that they expected consumers to remain loyal to Coke products and go elsewhere to buy them. Plus, while they were at those other stores, they would buy other products there that they would have otherwise bought from Costco.

In other words, Costco runs the risk of not only failing to save the money they were trying to save, but also losing revenue and customer satisfaction in the process.

I'm not in so much disbelief. Costco is a big company with smart people. I think that their risk is a calculated one. I can't see them not understanding the potential impact of this strategy if it fails.

And, even if Coca-Cola really doesn't budge after this "test," I am guessing that Costco may turn around after a few days or weeks and say "OK. We'll pay your most recently proposed price." And Coca-Cola will likely accept. Costco, then, would at least know that they truly tested the pricing floor and got the maximum discount they could get.

Again, we'll just have to wait and see what happens...

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Costco Uses Hardball Negotiation Tactics With Coca-Cola

I'm going to preempt today's installment of Whitepaper Wednesday to bring you some breaking news in a high-profile procurement case.

Retailing giant Costco has cut off inbound shipments of beverages from the Coca-Cola Co. due to unresolved price negotiations. While negotiations between retailers and their suppliers are very common, it is rare that a retailer will stop ordering a certain product line in the name of negotiation.

It's a bold move - Costco is risking ticking off its customers who pay for the privilege of shopping at its stores and expect to find their favorite items there in huge quantities - but, as I've learned throughout my purchasing career, sometimes it takes a bold move to get the results you want.

Not only is Costco making Coca-Cola "feel the pain" by cutting off its stream of orders, it is publicly shaming Coca-Cola. According to Yahoo Finance, "Costco has been aggressive in putting up signs on store shelves and notices on its Web site," including an alert that stated "Costco is committed to carrying name brand merchandise at the best possible prices. At this time, Coca-Cola has not provided Costco with competitive pricing so that we may pass along the value our members deserve."

Ouch!

Cutting off orders? Publicly denigrating a supplier's brand?

Negotiation doesn't get more hardball than that.

Is Coca-Cola telling Costco that it can keep its money?

Actually, they are handling it gracefully with a clear hint that they aren't strong enough to give Costco a take-it-or-leave-it ultimatum. In the above-linked article, Coca-Cola said in a statement that "Costco is an important customer and that it is committed to working with it 'in a spirit of fairness.'"

My guess is that this situation will be resolved soon and the relationship will continue as if this squabble never happened. But you gotta love the way that Costco's procurement is committed to their values - you may recall that I reported last month that Costco insists on testing its beef ingredients despite a supplier's unwillingness to supply them under such conditions.

Let's continue to watch Costco as its procurement strength continues to garner national publicity.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Monday, November 16, 2009

Ethically Negotiating With Multiple Suppliers

I hope you've enjoyed the latest PurchTips article "Ethical Negotiation With Multiple Suppliers."

This particular purchasing article is actually the first PurchTips that was based on a post on this blog. I handle so many questions about negotiating with suppliers other than the low bidder that I felt it necessary to distribute my advice in another format.

I think that the advice is sound for keeping you out of "ethical hot water." I hope that you find it useful - if you are planning a long purchasing career, you will likely run into a situation where the advice is applicable.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Thursday, November 12, 2009

A Tip For Buyers In The Trenches

Sometimes, us bloggers get so focused on strategic purchasing topics that we underserve buyers in the trenches - those men and women who work hard at ensuring that every critical delivery is on time no matter what crazy circumstances pop up. When I reflect on this work that buyers in the trenches do - the work that I did early in my purchasing career - it is clear that "tactical vs. strategic purchasing" is not synonymous with "unimportant vs. important purchasing."

Tactical purchasing activities, like day-to-day communications with suppliers, are important. You don't want a purchasing department to be a paper-pushing department, but some of the work in the trenches can be quite critical to the successful operation of a company.

With that in mind, I'll give a quick tip today for buyers in the trenches. I thought of this when my wife called a utility company, failed to achieve the desired result, and I had to place a second call to them to get what we wanted.

Here's the tip: "Don't allow the conversation to end until you hear what you want to hear."

Whether it is working with a supplier to deliver an item by a deadline of yours, getting a supplier to honor a warranty, getting a re-stocking fee waived, or any similar, reasonable, short-time-horizon request, the supplier usually has the flexibility to take care of you. You may need to speak with a higher-level person, but the flexibility is usually there. Don't take no for an answer.

Persistence goes a long way towards success when you're in the trenches of purchasing. Plus, it shows management the tenacity they are looking for in higher-level purchasing positions that involve broader negotiations.

Don't allow the conversation to end until you hear what you want to hear.

As a side note, I won't be teaching this technique to my children until they are adults (however, they seem innately know to try this ;) )!

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At

http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Whitepaper Wednesday - Advanced Sourcing Technology

Welcome back to another installment of Whitepaper Wednesday here on the Purchasing Certification Blog. Today, I'll be reviewing a whitepaper entitled "Advanced Sourcing:
Achieving the Next Level of Savings and Efficiency in Your Supply Chain" from Supply & Demand Chain Executive and CombineNet.

This whitepaper starts out by contrasting three different approaches to using technology in sourcing activities: the reverse auction, the e-RFx, and Advanced Sourcing via Expressive Commerce. Because it is written by CombineNet - a sourcing optimization solution provider - it is no surprise that the whitepaper paints Expressive Commerce as the best thing since sliced bread compared to the reverse auction and e-RFx options. Yet, some of the points made are not without merit. I'll share some highlights from the whitepaper's assessment of each approach...

Reverse Auctions - "For commodity items with little strategic value, or for items that are not being centrally sourced, reverse auctions can be very beneficial...[and] have produced significant results in many spend categories." However, the "lack of analytical power within reverse auction technologies forces a simplification of the items being sourced, to reduce the size of the problem set as well as its complexity. Sourcing teams group items with similar characteristics into ‘lots,’ ‘bundles,’ or ‘market baskets’ which" do not necessarily represent the most efficient combination of items from a supplier's perspective and, therefore, can result in inflated bids.

e-RFx - Compared to reverse auctions, there "is a broader ability to collect non-price (per item) factors in an e-RFx, including lead time, quality of service, terms and conditions, etc." However, the "analytical limitations of e-RFx also pose the same challenges as reverse auctions in the inclusion of side constraints, such as business rules and stakeholder preferences...More meaningful analysis is often conducted outside of the tool, by business analysts or others with a more technical skill set using data exported from the e-RFX tool. This analysis consists of identifying award scenario options and crunching numbers within a spreadsheet to reconcile supplier proposals with the organization’s constraints. This can be a very slow process, taking days or even weeks to analyze mildly complex scenarios."

Advanced Sourcing via Expressive Commerce - With Advanced Sourcing via Expressive Commerce:
  • "Suppliers may create their own bundles of items, conditional offers, and propose alternative items (or service attributes) to take advantage of their operational or production efficiencies."
  • "The sourcing team (including stakeholders) use an automated scenario analysis tool to build and scope ‘what-if?’ award scenarios to evaluate supplier proposals alongside their own constraints and preferences."
  • "The optimization engine calculates the total cost of the scenario, and identifies the cost impact of conditional offers, alternates, and side constraints."
  • "The buying team compares scenario results to find the solution that best meets their needs."

The whitepaper goes on to more substantially describe the analysis process available to the sourcing team.

While the whitepaper beats up the more simple approaches to sourcing (which, in my humble opinion, are just fine for a large percentage of sourcing projects), one thing that it doesn't do is describe whether "Advanced Sourcing via Expressive Commerce" leverages some of the more effective features of reverse auction and e-RFX approaches, namely whether the suppliers can get feedback on their rank, whether they can improve their proposal in an "electronic negotiation" manner, and whether their is a deadline for submitting proposals, which is an important tool in persuading a supplier to put its best offer on the table.

Though this whitepaper is somewhat incomplete in this manner and biased, it is still rather good and every procurement professional should evaluate how optimization can fit into its department's strategy. I know that I would have loved it if a tool like this was available in the mid-90's when I managed the procurement of outsourced aircraft component maintenance services. We had many categories of items that were contracted for repair and a supply base that had suppliers that were all over the map in terms of their capabilities to handle multiple categories. It leaves me wondering "what if?"

If you would like to get your own copy of this whitepaper, you can download it from Supply & Demand Chain Executive's Web site (registration required).

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Find More Good Resources For Procurement Leaders?
Check Out Our Web Site's New Whitepaper Section At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com/WPcharles

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

When Job Hunting, It’s The Little Things That Kill You, Part I

Since we've started posting our new Director of Education job around the Internet, we've gotten contacted by many interested candidates. Some impressive, some not so impressive.

In sifting through all of the responses, I'm noticing some patterns of how some applicants "shoot themselves in the foot" with their first communication. There are some simple things that these folks get wrong that immediately prevent them from being considered.

So, I am going to write a series of posts about these little mistakes that have a big impact. Don't misunderstand this series - it is not to rant about the individuals who have made these mistakes. It is to help as many people as possible avoid these mistakes so that they can have a better chance at advancing through the employment process.

Today, I'll focus on one mistake. That mistake is failing to follow the rules of proper written communication.

Failing to follow the rules of proper written communication is probably the most common. Now, maybe it is just because the Director of Education position is so writing-intensive, but I refuse to give any consideration to someone who has errors in his/her first correspondence about a job.

Let me give you an example...

I received an email through LinkedIn from someone that said "Can you please have a look at my profile, I am interested for this position...." That's 15 words. And do you know how many writing errors there were in this itty-bitty blurb?

Three.

This blurb should have been two sentences, not one. The portion reading "Can you please have a look at my profile?" should have ended with a question mark. And the grammar was bad on the last half, as it should have read "I am interested in this position," not "I am interested FOR this position."

Do you think that I would hire someone to write an online class, a PurchTips article, or even a post on this blog with such bad writing? I don't think so.

Is this an isolated example?

Not at all. Many people - including people who are probably very smart and successful - make similar writing mistakes. The phrase "you don't get a second chance to make a first impression" is so true when it comes to applying for jobs. Failing to make sure that your written communication is technically correct is an all-too-common - and very avoidable - mistake.

If you're thinking "that doesn't apply to me," I urge you to revisit some basic rules of writing and/or have someone else read your correspondence before sending it. You just may find that there is something you could tweak to give yourself a better chance at advancing through the employment process.

This series to be continued from time to time here on the Purchasing Certification Blog.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Monday, November 09, 2009

Seeking Purchasing Expert For Director of Education Position

Here at Next Level Purchasing, we are planning for another huge year of growth in 2010. Part of accomplishing this growth will be creating more and more educational content for purchasing professionals.

To support this expansion of content, we are recruiting for our newly created Director of Education position. Here is the job description, with application instructions at the bottom...


The Director of Education position is a newly created position at Next Level Purchasing, expected to be filled in February or March of 2010 at the earliest. The Director of Education will be responsible for developing new educational content to serve Next Level Purchasing's customers and students - purchasing and supply management professionals from throughout the world.

Responsibilities include:

  • Writing material for new online purchasing courses, newsletters, blog posts, podcasts, whitepapers, seminars, webinars, videos, and other publications and media
  • Delivering webinars
  • Answering student questions by email and video mail
  • Engaging in social networking, including posting material on Twitter and answering questions on LinkedIn
  • Reviewing and updating existing course material
  • Identifying, recruiting, and interviewing guest experts for podcasts
  • Contributing ideas at staff meetings
  • Meeting revenue goals for newly created content
  • Delivering seminars at various events and at client sites
  • Sharing purchasing expertise with the company in order to strengthen Next Level Purchasing's position as a leader in purchasing and supply management education
The ideal candidate will have:

  • Five or more years of strategic purchasing experience, having reached at least the director or manager level at a large company (> $1 billion in annual revenue)
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills for both formal and informal communications
  • Excellent presentation skills
  • Creativity
  • Comfort with and an interest in using emerging technologies
  • A passion for education
  • Expertise in a broad range of purchasing activities, including inventory and supply chain management, technical sourcing projects including those involving close interfacing with other functions such as Engineering and Quality, and leading-edge procurement practices
  • The ability to work successfully in a team environment
  • SPSM® Certification preferred - will be required no later than 90 days after employment

The position is based in Next Level Purchasing's offices near the Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania) International Airport and will involve some travel.

To apply, Send your resume, cover letter, and salary history to jobs4q2009@nextlevelpurchasing.com

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Thursday, November 05, 2009

Procurement Professionals Put In Charge Of The Warehouse May Be In For A Sobering Experience

As the value of procurement work becomes more apparent to senior management, it is not uncommon for procurement professionals to be responsible for more aspects of the supply chain, including managing warehouse operations. Though it is wonderful to be entrusted with expanded responsibilities, certain things may happen in the warehouse that are beyond the typical procurement professional's wildest dreams (or nightmares).

Here's an example...



To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Wednesday, November 04, 2009

Whitepaper Wednesday - Vetting Vendors

Welcome back to another installment of Whitepaper Wednesday here on the Purchasing Certification Blog. This week, I'll be reviewing a whitepaper entitled "Vetting Vendors From a Procurement and Vendor Management Perspective" from Gartner and CFO.com.

This whitepaper focuses almost exclusively on the sources of information a procurement professional can use to determine the ongoing viability of a vendor. Here are a few of those sources and what the whitepaper had to say about each...
  • Dun & Bradstreet, Hoover's, Standard & Poors, and others: The whitepaper points out that these sources report on the creditworthiness of vendors but cautions that the information may be self-reported or dated.
  • Stock performance: Stock prices and direction are indicators of the degree of confidence that the market has in a vendor. The whitepaper does point out that stock performance reflects an investor's perspective and not a customer's - a vendor can be financially successful while not being as customer-friendly as one may expect.
  • Analyst enterprises (for example, Gartner): The whitepaper extols the benefits of getting information from analysts whose "breadth of customer interactions" allow them to offer unique insight into a vendor. While the whitepaper doesn't list any downsides to relying on analysts, I will say that one should never assume that an analyst or advisory firm is an expert in every market or on every vendor - they are not, plain and simple. Plus, there may be an underlying conflict of interest as vendors are often customers of the analyst firms. If you're curious to learn more about such a conflict of interest in the analyst world, you can find many power-packed rants about the topic on Spend Matters where Jason Busch pulls no punches in exposing what happens behind the proverbial curtain at analyst firms.

The whitepaper also transitions into a section where it recommends evaluating a vendor's quality levels over time as well as its pricing strategy. Those sections are thought provoking and worth reading, too.

If you'd like to get your own copy of this whitepaper, you can download a copy from CFO.com (registration required).

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Find More Good Resources For Procurement Leaders?
Check Out Our Web Site's New Whitepaper Section At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com/WPcharles

Monday, November 02, 2009

Tip-off To A Tactical Procurement Mindset

I hope that you have enjoyed the article "Purchasing Managers' Worst KPI Mistakes."

This article was inspired by a discussion I read on the Strategic Sourcing & Procurement Group on LinkedIn. That discussion was started by a procurement manager who wanted to know what key performance indicators that others used.

What followed was an absolute barrage of examples of KPI's. Some were good. Some were...well, let's just say that they showed that the individual was stuck in a tactical mindset.

One of the main points of the "worst mistakes" article was that not every performance indicator is a key performance indicator. When a senior executive wants to learn what the procurement team considers to be a key performance indicator and the procurement leader replies with performance indicators that are like some of the worst from the LinkedIn discussion, it becomes immediately evident that the procurement department is stuck in tactical mode.

When the word "key" (or the letter "K") is used to discuss performance indicators, what the senior executive is looking for is integration - some type of connection between what the procurement department is doing and what the organization as a whole is trying to accomplish.

Providing a mere performance indicator when asked for a key performance indicator is a tip-off that the mindset in procurement is too tactical. So, remember, make sure your KPI's are truly "key" performance indicators by demonstrating the integration with the focus of the organization.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

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