Thursday, September 30, 2010

Free Procurement-Finance Teleseminar Today

Today, I’ll be participating in the September Strategic Sourcing & Procurement LinkedIn group member call. This month, we’re talking about Finance, specifically the relationship between finance and procurement. Helping you navigate this huge opportunity for collaboration, efficiency gains and increase cash flow will be:
  • Yours Truly, who will share what me and the Next Level Purchasing team are seeing in the field as we roll out new courses on the Finance/Procurement relationship, and
  • Drew Hofler, who manages financial solutions for Ariba and has a background in banking and accounting, sharing best practices of companies that have navigated the liquidity crisis and improved the finance/procurement relationship.

Participation- questions, insights and discussion - will be encouraged from the audience. These calls are a great way to get input from your peers about the topic.

The details:

Thursday, September 30th, 2010
8am Pacific Time/11:00AM Eastern US Time (15:00 GMT)

No pre-registration for the call is required, but dial in details are only provided here to members of the Strategic Sourcing & Procurement LinkedIn Group. If you are not already a member, you can request to join here.

I hope to hear from you on the call!

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

The Best of Whitepaper Wednesday, Part I

I started Whitepaper Wednesday on the Purchasing Certification Blog in September of 2008. In the two years since the inception of Whitepaper Wednesday, I've reviewed nearly 100 procurement, supply chain, and leadership whitepapers.

In the coming weeks, I'll be introducing some of the procurement profession's newest thought leaders who will be authoring future Whitepaper Wednesday posts. While we're working out the details, I thought that I'd use this week's installment to link you to my 10 favorite Whitepaper Wednesday posts of the past two years.

If you haven't been following Whitepaper Wednesday since 2008, this may be especially valuable to you. So here are the links...

Marketing The Procurement Function (September 22, 2010)

Inventory Optimization (August 25, 2010)

World-Class Procurement (April 28, 2010)

Spend Analysis vs. ERP (March 3, 2010)

Contingent Workforce Management (October 14, 2009)

10 Steps To Lower Procurement Costs (September 2, 2009)

How CFO's Evaluate Big Purchases (June 24, 2009)

Supplier Performance Management (April 1, 2009)

The CFO's View of Procurement (November 19, 2008)

Developing Purchasing Teams (September 10, 2008)

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Find More Good Resources For Procurement Leaders?
Check Out Our Web Site's New Whitepaper Section At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com/WPcharles

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

How Would A Cyber-Blitz Threaten Your Supply Chain?

According to an article on comcast.net entitled "U.S. mounting first test of cyber-blitz response plan," the US government is today beginning a test of their response to a cyber attack that might threaten "vital services such as power, water and banks." I've written previously about how cyber attacks pose a very real threat to supply chains and the above-linked article acknowledges that "bits and bytes of malicious computer code could soon be as central to 21st-century conflict as bullets and bombs."

A cyber-blitz involves more than just nuisance computer problems. Because so many processes are computerized, a large-scale cyber attack could cut off electricity to large regions - including those regions in which your plants and your supplier facilities are located - and disrupt commerce by halting the flow of digital cash between financial institutions.

Think about what would happen to your supply chain if such an attack occurred and went unmitigated. It's not pretty is it?

But is it far fetched? In the article, U.S. Army General Keith Alexander, the head of a new military cyber-warfare unit, calls such a destructive attack "a real probability."

Does your procurement contingency plan address cyber attacks?

Do you think it should?

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Monday, September 27, 2010

Do Great Leaders Admit Mistakes?

One thing that personally annoys me is when people cannot admit they made mistakes. Another thing is when circumstances or rules prevent them from correcting the error.

I think about US President George W. Bush's admission a few years ago, after beginning the Iraq war on the premise that weapons of mass destruction were being hidden there, that there were no weapons of mass destruction there. Despite this admission, Bush tried to justify the war anyway and never admitted to a mistake.

I think back to earlier this year when baseball umpire Jim Joyce made an erroneous call that cost pitcher Armando Galarraga a perfect game (the ultimate feat for a baseball pitcher). While Joyce apologized, Major League Baseball's "system" prevents such a call from being overturned.

I think back to a personal purchase of mine last week where I asked for a refund on the basis that the service did not produce the results promised and how the management implied that my lack of satisfaction could have been due to my lack of understanding of what I was buying and they'd need to investigate the matter. I eventually successfully negotiated that refund though I would contend that I should not have had to work for it.

As a business leader, I don't feel that I'm allergic to the act of apologizing. The words "I'm sorry" and "my fault" are in my vocabulary. I don't feel that saying these things makes me weaker. I feel that it makes me stronger because I can continue to be followed after-the-fact.

But why is admitting mistakes uncommon among leaders? Doesn't the arrogance of refusing to admit a mistake turn followers off and make one less influential?

When future generations study the George W. Bushes of the world, will they write that the description of a great leader is someone who refuses to admit mistakes? Do your leadership idols admit mistakes? Do you?

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Friday, September 24, 2010

Outsourcing vs. Insourcing...Simplified!

Many companies ponder at length the decision of whether or not to outsource a certain business process. And there has been much academic material written on how to make that decision, including one of Next Level Purchasing's own articles from 2005 entitled "The Make Or Buy Procurement Decision." There are a lot of factors that organizations consider when making the seemingly tough decision whether to insource or outsource.

But, in many cases, the decision doesn't need to be difficult at all. And it can be made using two factors: (1) the importance of supply to your organization and (2) the importance of your business to the supply base.

So, I have created "The World’s Simplest Outsourcing Decision Matrix" to help guide decisions in these more basic cases. Here it is...



The underlying premise is this: if getting reliable delivery, flawless quality, and accurate and timely information for a particular product or process is important to your organization yet the amount of your business is too small in the scheme of the industry to be considered uber-important to the supply base, outsourcing the manufacture of that product or the performance of that process exposes your organization to a level of risk that it is unlikely to find acceptable. Keep those activities in-house.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Thursday, September 23, 2010

SPSM's: Increase Your Recognition As A Thought Leader

Over the past 2+ years, I've been posting reviews of whitepapers on this blog as part of our weekly "Whitepaper Wednesday" feature. Now, as part of our commitment to helping purchasing professionals have rewarding careers, I want to turn the Whitepaper Wednesday reigns over to some talented SPSM's interested in positioning themselves as thought leaders in the profession.

In addition to the recognition of posting on the heavily-trafficked Purchasing Certification Blog, we will also award one Continuing Education Hour for each Whitepaper Wednesday post contributed. These Continuing Education Hours can be applied to SPSM® or SPSM2 recertification requirements.

If you have earned the SPSM® Certification and are interested in contributing to a future installment of Whitepaper Wednesday, contact us at help@nextlevelpurchasing.com no later than Tuesday September 28. I am looking forward to seeing who will step up and be the profession's newest thought leaders!

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

Whitepaper Wednesday - Marketing The Procurement Function

Welcome back to another installment of Whitepaper Wednesday here on the Purchasing Certification Blog. Today, I’ll be reviewing a whitepaper entitled “Influence More Spend and Drive More Savings” from Denali.

At the core of this whitepaper is the belief that the key to being able to get more spend under the procurement department’s control is being able to successfully implement basic marketing principles. But can learning “the four P’s of marketing” really make sense in the context of modern procurement? Read on!

The first section of this whitepaper was entitled “Define Your Marketing Strategy & Objectives.” It gave a very academic – and not so procurement-centric – explanation of putting together a marketing plan for the procurement function.

I was worried.

The next section about conducting focus groups calmed my concerns, however. It gave some very practical advice about how to engage with internal customers in order to get them to buy-in to procurement initiatives, such as “understanding your target audience and their pain points will help you clearly define your organization’s strategy and objectives while providing the opportunity to prioritize and align your services with stakeholder interests.” This section goes on to give some real-world examples of common complaints that internal customers have and how procurement departments can use this type of feedback for improvement.

I felt a little better about the whitepaper. But would the forthcoming “four P’s” discussion turn this whitepaper into an incarnation of those boring textbooks that you’d fall asleep on in your dorm room while making a feeble attempt at staying interested and awake during your college days?

Fortunately, the answer is a resounding “no!”

The four P’s were adapted quite appropriately for a procurement application. In particular, the second P – Promotion – injected a little creatively found too infrequently in procurement departments with suggestions like “Procurement organizations can use targeted emails; company newsletters; corporate-wide events; or unique, personal give-aways as a springboard into new categories and departments” and “coordinate with your finance department to…implement a ‘How to stretch your budget’ campaign during the annual budgeting process.”

I admit it – I am a bit surprised at how well Denali applied “Marketing 101” concepts to a procurement situation. If you would like to check out the rest of the whitepaper’s good content that I didn’t have time to cover here, you can download your own copy from Denali’s website.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Find More Good Resources For Procurement Leaders?
Check Out Our Web Site's New Whitepaper Section At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com/WPcharles

Monday, September 20, 2010

Tick, Tick, Tick...Is The "Use By" Date Approaching For These Negotiation Techniques?

Today, the National Bureau of Economic Research announced that the most recent economic recession in the USA had ended in June 2009. In their announcement, they were careful not to imply that economic conditions have been great since then (that would surely get some opposition, right?), noting that "the committee did not conclude that economic conditions since that month have been favorable or that the economy has returned to operating at normal capacity...Economic activity is typically below normal in the early stages of an expansion, and it sometimes remains so well into the expansion."

However, as economic hardships continue as evidenced by the stubborn unemployment rate which remains near double digits, there is still time to use the negotiation techniques shared in the article "Negotiation Techniques With A Shelf Life."

The thing that got me thinking about recession-era negotiation techniques was the supplier relationship tension dogging iStockphoto as I reported last week. In a series of posts on their online forum, iStockphoto's COO tried to explain the company's decision to slash the existing supplier payment structure. Unfortunately for him, the suppliers voiced their opposition loudly, clearly, and, in some cases, profanely in response.

While the COO tried to explain the "need" for the changes, he never once mentioned any other constituencies that were affected by a desire to reduce cost. No layoffs. No salary reductions. No budget cuts. Just supplier royalty reductions.

Could the "Share In The Sacrifice" technique discussed in the article have worked better in that case?

After reading the responses in the forum and on supplier blogs, it's hard to believe it could have made anything worse.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Procurement In Poland Has Become More Professional

The global proliferation and recognition of the SPSM® Certification continues to grow. Last month, Next Level Purchasing certified the first SPSM in Poland, making that country the 55th in which procurement professionals have earned the SPSM.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Whitepaper Wednesday - Procurement-Finance Collaboration

Welcome back to another installment of Whitepaper Wednesday here on the Purchasing Certification Blog. This week, I'll be reviewing a whitepaper entitled "Seven Points of Engagement for Procurement and Finance to Improve Collaboration" from Basware and ZDNet.

This whitepaper strongly encourages collaboration between procurement and finance teams. Why is such collaboration important? The whitepaper claims that, by collaborating, these two teams "can unlock financial forecasting, savings, working capital and risk reduction opportunities that sit at the intersection of the two functions."

The big question is: how do you start collaborating if there has historically not been much communication?

Well, at the core of the whitepaper are seven examples of topics that can be discussed to kickstart that relationship. I won't cover each of them here, but I will address a couple of my favorites:

Starting a dialogue and planning for procurement’s involvement in the budgeting and planning process. This discussion helps ensure that identified savings become actual savings. In addition, the procurement department can coordinate common needs among departments that do not typically make any efforts at consolidating their purchases.

Educating procurement on finance objectives, measurements and goals. The whitepaper acknowledges that the majority of procurement professionals lack a finance background. Yet, the quality of procurement performance can help or hinder the achievement of an organization's financial goals. Naturally, then, it is important for procurement professionals to learn as much about finance as they can!

Getting functional finance involvement in vendor scorecard and supplier performance measurement. This type of activity can help a procurement department communicate how finance can contribute to "enhancing [supplier] relationships and overall performance (e.g., through offering flexibility on discounting and payment terms when suppliers may have less access to available capital to fund an increase in order volumes)."

If you know me, you know that I am a big-time advocate of procurement and finance working together. So, this first whitepaper I've reviewed from Basware made a good impression on me. If you'd like your own copy of the whitepaper (with the other four potential discussions), you can download your own copy from the ZDNet website (registration required).

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Find More Good Resources For Procurement Leaders?
Check Out Our Web Site's New Whitepaper Section At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com/WPcharles

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Who Is Going To The Chemical Purchasing Summit This Week?

Reed Business Information, parent company of the dearly departed Purchasing Magazine, is hosting the 3rd Annual Chemical Purchasing Summit this Thursday and Friday in Boston. On Friday, I'll be leading a workshop featuring 45 minutes of content from Next Level Purchasing's "Finance For Strategic Procurement" online class series.

I've been able to wrangle a little price deal for readers of my blog who wish to attend the Summit. If you use the promo code GTU47433, you'll be able to get the "early bird price" which expired in July. That'll save you a cool $100!

To learn more about the Summit and to register at the discounted price, please visit http://www.icisconference.com/chemicalpurchasing2010.

I hope to see you there!

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Monday, September 13, 2010

You’ll Always Think You Do A Great Job (Until You Benchmark)

Before I get into the procurement part of this post, let me tell you about a story that inspired it.

At the beginning of August, I decided I would take up a new hobby: running. I’m a goal-oriented person, so I set the goal to work my way up to be able to run my entire neighborhood plan without stopping – about 2 miles of a very hilly landscape – by the end of the month.

Within two or three weeks, I met my goal. So, I set a new one: work my way up to running 3.1 miles by September 11. There was a local 5K (3.1 mile) race that day and I wanted to be able to participate. Again, I was able to reach my goal ahead of time.

In the days leading up to the race, I felt good, almost cocky. Like “Look at me – I’m in great shape!”

Then came the humbling part: the actual race this past Saturday.

As the race was about to begin, I positioned myself near the start line. There were about 300 total runners in the race. Before the horn sounded to start the race, I was in front of probably about 250 of them.

The horn sounded. And within seconds, I was at the back of the pack. Everyone just flew past me.

I wanted to keep a comfortable pace. My goal was simply to finish, not to win. But, still, it was frustrating knowing that I was slow compared to the other runners. People 20 years my senior were far in front of me and getting farther.

In the last mile, I did start blowing past the people who emptied their tanks by running too fast too soon. That boosted my confidence a little.

But any boost of confidence was shot back down when the results were posted. Out of 25 runners in my class (men between 35 and 39) who finished, I finished 24th.

I have some work to do, don’t I?

Having the job I do (head of a procurement training and certification organization), I couldn’t help but see the parallels between my running and many procurement departments that we work with. We provide a procurement skills assessment and benchmarking program where we measure the skills of procurement teams and compare them with other procurement teams. And, occasionally, we work with some confident – dare I say cocky – procurement leaders who believe that their teams are world-class.

And then comes the benchmarking and comparisons.

Some procurement teams score below average. And some of their leaders are incredulous at the results.

There must be something wrong with the assessment, they think. But is there? When you have different procurement departments being asked the same exact questions that were not previously disclosed and then comparing results, there’s really no way to taint those results. It’s the same people “running the same course.”

That’s the value of benchmarking. Getting an objective comparison. And knowing not just if you’re good in your own opinion, but knowing whether you’re better or worse – faster or slower – than other people doing the same thing.

So, if you want to truly reach your potential, benchmark. You may just find that you have work to do to get where you want to be.

I know I did.

UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2012:  I had some work to do and I did it.  In the two years since the original post, I have run in many more races, including two half-marathons (13.1 miles).  In the latest one, I finished 39th out of 73 in my class.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Friday, September 10, 2010

Are Crowdsourced Suppliers Treated Better Than Traditional Suppliers In Economically Challenging Times?

On Wikipedia, crowdsourcing is defined as “the act of outsourcing tasks, traditionally performed by an employee or contractor, to a large group of people or community (a crowd), through an open call.” In describing the benefits of crowdsourcing, that same entry notes that “the community may feel a brand-building kinship with the crowdsourcing organization, which is the result of an earned sense of ownership through contribution and collaboration.”

So, in other words, an organization that practices crowdsourcing has “happy suppliers,” right?

Not so fast!

One of the earliest crowdsourcing organizations, iStockphoto, is now being watched to see if crowdsourced suppliers are treated as firmly as traditional suppliers in economically challenging times and in certain circumstances. Yesterday, CNET published an article entitled “iStock growing pains show crowdsourcing challenge” that chronicles iStockphoto’s recent announcement that it was changing the way that it calculates contributor royalties (i.e., the amount that it pays its suppliers).

iStockphoto estimates that 24% of their exclusive contributors/suppliers will see their portion of sales decrease. Needless to say, those contributors/suppliers are not happy.

Though crowdsourcing sounds warm and fuzzy, the bottom line is that business is business. And, in this economy where most suppliers are being pressured for lower prices, employee pay cuts are common, and discretionary spending is being choked off, it’s no surprise that even crowdsourced suppliers are being pinched. Especially in iStockphoto’s situation.

What do I mean by that?

Well, iStockphoto is a subsidiary of Getty Images. Getty Images, once a publicly-held company, was purchased by private equity investment firm Hellman & Friedman, LLC in 2008.

Did Hellman & Friedman buy Getty because they love photography?

No. They bought Getty for the reasons they’ve bought other companies: to make the companies more profitable and either sell them for more than they paid for them or to take them public. I predict that Getty will be sold or will go public in 2012 or 2013.

In these private equity ownership structures, there is a lot of pressure on the executives to do the two things to increase profits: increase sales and cut costs. Like most other organizations, iStockphoto’s sales growth rate depends on the economy, so attacking costs in the form of contributor/supplier royalties isn’t an approach that is out of character for a private equity-owned firm. Typically, the management teams of private equity-owned companies face two possible fates: (a) fail to grow profitability and lose their jobs, or (b) grow profitability and get nice payouts when the company is "flipped."

Considering all of that background, should crowdsourced supply be perceived as another cost to be attacked or should it be treated more preferentially?

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Wednesday, September 08, 2010

Stockout Costs: Beyond The Calculations

I hope that you have enjoyed the article "Calculating The Cost of a Stockout."

The article goes into the empirical costs that are associated with stockouts. But are there other losses that a company can incur that do not make it into the calculation?

You bet there are!

Since the incident cited in the article where I had to go to another retailer for a different brand of tires, I realized something. I actually like the new brand of tires - BF Goodrich - better! My car seems to handle better and gone is the tire squealing when I go around bends a little fast (something I tend to do sometimes [: ).

So, I just may be a BF Goodrich customer for life provided that my new tires continue to perform well over time. In marketing and sales, they often talk about the "lifetime value of a customer."

When those of us on the supply chain side start thinking about the cost of a stockout, we may want to start thinking about the likelihood of customer loss and the lifetime value of those customers. For an interesting primer on customer lifetime value, check out this tool from the Harvard Business School.

I know that, at least in one case, a stockout led to lost value beyond the short-term costs.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Friday, September 03, 2010

When The Going Gets Tough, The Weak Blame Their Suppliers

In pondering some of the topics I've touched upon here over the years, one topic has come up multiple times. That's because it is one of my biggest procurement pet peeves.

What is it?

It's when companies blame their suppliers for problems they should have averted. Though I've posted several examples of this bad practice, I've never tied them all together. Well, now I'll do just that.

Here are some links to some of the classic "blame the supplier" examples...

It's Never The Vendor's Fault

Is Outsourcing a Convenient Excuse for CEO's (Even When Murder Is Involved)?

Do Your Suppliers Bully You Into Compromising Safety?

The Worst Oil Spill In History: Are Suppliers & Supplier Management Practices To Blame?

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Thursday, September 02, 2010

Whitepaper Wednesday - Supplier Insurance Requirements

Welcome back to another installment of Whitepaper Wednesday here on the Purchasing Certification Blog. Yes, I know it’s Thursday, but I just had to take a second look at today’s whitepaper before I released this review. You’ll know why shortly.

Today, I’ll be reviewing a “research snapshot” (which, for the sake of the occasion, I’ll refer to as a whitepaper) entitled “Insurance Requirements and Certificates for Suppliers” from CAPS Research. When reading the teaser for this whitepaper, I hoped that I would get a good feel for how many companies require their suppliers to maintain larger-than-required-by-law amounts of insurance, how many require suppliers to provide certificates of insurance, and how many do not require suppliers to provide certificates of insurance.

After reading the whitepaper, I don’t feel confident that I learned what I wanted to learn.

There were 24 percentages listed in the whitepaper. Twenty of them were calculated incorrectly!

For example, the whitepaper says that it received responses from 51 manufacturing organizations. In calculating the “percent of organizations that require suppliers to maintain additional types and amounts of insurance beyond the requirements of the state or nation where work is being performed,” the whitepaper indicated that 47 organizations did, but listed the percentage as 85.5%. Forty-seven out of 51 is 92.2%. Forty-seven is 85.5% of 55.

I could forgive CAPS if this was an isolated error. But these errors were made throughout, rendering the whitepaper a shoddy piece of research in my eyes and one not to be trusted. Therefore, I will not even bother writing anything else about this abomination of a whitepaper.

If you would like to download this whitepaper for yourself – maybe, after reading this post, CAPS will fix their math – you can do so from the CAPS Research website (registration required).

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Find More Good Resources For Procurement Leaders?
Check Out Our Web Site's New Whitepaper Section At
http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com/WPcharles

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