Friday, October 29, 2010

Should You Pay An Invoice That Doesn't Correspond With A Purchase Order?

There are always types of products and services bought where standard procedure is to deliver then bill, with no PO required. In many cases, this is OK.

However, some internal customers engage in these types of arrangements to get around purchasing policies. To be able to put an end to this type of behavior, there are a few things needed:

  1. A written company policy on when it is and when it is not acceptable to pay an invoice submitted without a purchase order.
  2. Notification of all suppliers of the policy, including a statement saying that invoices submitted without a purchase order will not be paid (that should get their attention!).
  3. A process that makes it more cumbersome for the end user to break the rules than it is to follow the rules. An example would be that, to pay an invoice like this, the requester would have to fill out a special form with justification why the policy could not have been followed. Ideally, this form should require the signature of the boss of the end user and the head of the end user’s division (such as a vice president).

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Thursday, October 28, 2010

October 2010's Dedicated Purchasing Student of the Month Is...

Every month, Next Level Purchasing recognizes a student who has made impressive progress in learning more about the field of purchasing and supply management. We are excited to announce that the Dedicated Purchasing Student of the Month for October 2010 is...



Michael Crittendon, SPSM, a Milk Buyer for Topco in Skokie, Illinois, USA. Michael completed all six Senior Professional in Supply Management® Program classes during the month of September! Michael also passed the SPSM® Certification exam and was certified!

Next Level Purchasing and the procurement community around the world congratulate Michael and his dedication to establishing a successful purchasing career!

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Whitepaper Wednesday - Expense Control

As mentioned yesterday, today marks a new direction for Whitepaper Wednesday as I introduce two new authors. Today's installment is written by Jeff Dean, SPSM. Please help me welcome Jeff as a new contributor to the Purchasing Certification Blog!

Welcome to another installment of Whitepaper Wednesday here on the Purchasing Certification Blog. Today, I will be reviewing a whitepaper entitled “Profiles in Expense Management: The right balance between control and empowerment at mid-size companies” from cfo.com.

This is a large whitepaper that discusses many key points relative to purchasing and finance such as economic prospects, cost controls, tracking and analyzing spend patterns (and the difficulties associated with) and employee compliance with procedures relating to these subjects to name a few.

The most interesting thing about this whitepaper is that it was published in March 2006 after extensive research from CFO Research Services with companies like Pepsi Americas, Cigna and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The 353 individual survey respondents were mostly CFO’s, but also included Controllers, VP of finance and CEO’s as well as a mix of finance executives (CEO, EVP or SVP of finance, and directors of finance). Fifty-two percent of surveyed companies revenues were under $250 million. It is interesting to look back on what items these folks thought were going to be a focus and where the focus shifted after the major economy upheaval of the last few years happened.

The first part of this whitepaper goes into detail about the research program and parameters and the “sustained economic optimism” for businesses. Interestingly, at the time of this report “94% of respondents in the construction and real estate industries foresee economic growth, as do more than three-quarters of their peers in the retail and wholesale industries.” The whitepaper continues on how the finance department will take an even more substantial role in running today’s businesses, great news for those of us in the purchasing field!

Another one of the other interesting points that are made is that these companies will be “focused on keeping their workforces productive and engaged, not on cutting back on headcount and benefits.” From my perspective, we have actually seen the exact opposite. In my position and that of some of my close peers, we are expected to do more and expand our job duties and cutback on headcount.

The paper then shifts to indirect spend and brings up some very important topics for purchasing and finance folks. Tracking and analyzing spend patterns was ranked as “very or extremely important” to those surveyed. As we learn through our experience and certifications, we need to track and analyze many different sources of spend (depending on what kind of business we work for) to not only prove the value of the purchasing department, but to also look at where our leaks are, and how to fix them.

The next subject, compliance, is very near and dear to me. It discusses how important compliance is in reference to policies and procedures for your company. In the companies surveyed, 87% agree that employees are “complying with policies mandated for spending” but do require constant oversight by the finance department. I don’t want to ruin the read for you, but there are very interesting details in this section, if, like me, compliance is important to you and your organization.

In conclusion, I thought that this report was lengthy, but worth the read. It is interesting to look back at a report of how we thought things would have been, how they ended up and how some things stay important no matter the economic conditions. Here is a link for the article and it may require you to sign up to the site: http://www.cfo.com/whitepapers/index.cfm/download/10339483.

- Jeff Dean, SPSM

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Coming Tomorrow: New Purchasing Thought Leaders Take The Reigns For Whitepaper Wednesday

For over two years, I have been reviewing purchasing and supply chain whitepapers almost every Wednesday on the Purchasing Certification Blog. Tomorrow, a new chapter of Whitepaper Wednesday will begin.

I will be welcoming to the Purchasing Certification Blog two new contributors who will bring top-quality whitepaper reviews to your computer or mobile phone: Jeff Dean, SPSM and Erick Opdenbosch, SPSM. These two gentlemen are purchasing and logistics managers, emerging thought leaders in the purchasing profession, and - as indicated by their credentials - earners of the SPSM® Certification.

I am excited about the fresh viewpoints and keen insights they will bring to their reviews of purchasing and supply chain whitepapers. I think that you will value their perspective as you evaluate strategies and approaches for improving purchasing and chain performance in your organization.

Please stop by the Purchasing Certification Blog tomorrow and help me welcome Jeff. Then return the following Wednesday to help me welcome Erick.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Monday, October 25, 2010

Check Out The Archived Procurement-Finance Teleseminar!

About a month ago, I was a guest panelist on Ariba's monthly teleseminar for their Strategic Sourcing & Procurement LinkedIn Group. The topic of the teleseminar was procurement-finance collaboration.

If you were unable to participate in the teleseminar live, you can now access a recording of it. Just go to http://exchange.ariba.com/community/supplywatch.

Enjoy!

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Thursday, October 21, 2010

Why Was The Procurement Specialist Embarrassed In A Meeting With The CFO?



To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

"Reshoring" Is A Smoking Hot Trend: Look Who Is Doing It!

One of the hottest purchasing buzzwords this year is "reshoring." I'll define reshoring as "the act of beginning or resuming to purchase from domestic suppliers those products or services that were previously purchased from foreign suppliers."

Sites such as Evolving Excellence, the National Tooling Machining Association, the Huffington Post, and several others have featured material on reshoring this year. Most of these sites focused on reshoring initiatives being fired up by American corporations.

But the grass is green on the other side of the border as well. Can you guess who else is engaging in reshoring?

Well, in reading a New York Times article entitled "Mexican authorities make record drug bust, seizing 105 tons of marijuana" from earlier this week, I learned that Mexican drug cartels are apparently jumping on the reshoring bandwagon as well. According to the article, "Although Mexican drug cartels smuggle marijuana from South America, the drug is increasingly produced in Mexico. Cannabis production in Mexico increased 35 percent to 12,000 hectares (29,652 acres) in 2009, from 8,900 hectares (21,991 acres) the previous year, according to the U.S. State Department’s 2010 International Narcotics Control report. The report attributed the increase to drug cartel efforts to 'diminish reliance on foreign suppliers.'"

If you're in a fog as to how reliance on foreign suppliers can be any different than reliance on domestic suppliers, I think Jason from Spend Matters did a good job quickly summarizing some of the additional risks organizations face by offshoring in his recent post entitled "Bringing Spend (and Production Back Home) -- An Economic Case for Re-Shoring."

Having written all of that, here's my opinion. Find the right supply base for each category of goods/services without any predisposition as to whether domestic or global sourcing is the right move. Certainly there are benefits and drawbacks - risks and rewards - to each. Sometimes, the rewards justify the risk of choosing one over the other. But you won't know without an educated approach.

So before you conclude that reshoring is the way to go because "everyone's doing it," take a deep breath and really think about it. Good opportunities can be wasted if situations aren't thoroughly evaluated.


To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Monday, October 18, 2010

Vendor Reference Checks: Worthless or Worthwhile?

I hope that you have enjoyed the article "4 Questions To Ask Vendors' References."

The main point of the article is that you need to take a well-thought-out approach to doing vendor reference checks. If not done well, vendor reference checks can be worthless.

As mentioned in the article, "a vendor will never give you a poor reference." So, if you ask dumb quesitons, you will not get any useful information. Here are some examples:

BUYER: "How well has the vendor worked out for you?"

REFERENCE: "The vendor has worked out very well."

BUYER: "Have you had any major problems with the vendor?"

REFERENCE: "No. Nothing major."

BUYER: "So you would recommend the vendor?"

REFERENCE: "Yeah, I'd definitely recommend them."

What else could a buyer expect? Nothing right? Yet, this is how so many reference checks go.

So, having covered some examples of bad questions, let's cover some good questions as well as answers that will either give you comfort or concern...

BUYER: "What's your relationship with the vendor?"

REFERENCE: "They are perhaps our most important vendor. We have only a handful of vendors that affect whether or not we have an advantage over our competitors and they are one of them. If they fail, we fail." (This should give you comfort)

REFERENCE: "They are our backup vendor for non-critical production materials. We use them from time-to-time when our primary vendor's capacity has filled up." (This should give you concern)

BUYER: "How do you interact with the vendor?"

REFERENCE: "I personally deal with them on a daily basis. We are always communicating about schedule changes and shifts in demand." (This should give you comfort)

REFERENCE: "Well, I dealt with them primarily when we were negotiating the contract. I check in with them once a quarter to make sure that they feel the contract is going well." (This should give you concern)

BUYER: "Describe a situation where the vendor disappointed you, and how they responded."

REFERENCE: "There was one situation where we had to put different shipping instructions on our PO. We emailed them an order with our standard instructions on, remembered that we needed shipping done differently, and issued a change order two minutes later. They processed the original order because they didn't notice anything different on the change order and thought it was a duplication. As a result, our shipment went out by truck and was looking to be 24 hours late. When we told them about it, they sent a partial shipment via air freight at no additional cost to us and reduced our time waiting for parts to just six hours. They then voluntarily gave us a 30% credit on our invoice for the misunderstanding. In terms of cost, that made things turn out pretty evenly for us." (This should give you comfort)

REFERENCE: "Everything goes well most of the time. But there was this one order a few months ago where we got the wrong items on a Friday. It was clearly their fault. But when we called at 3:00, the general manager said that he was unwilling to make his crew work the one hour required of overtime on a holiday weekend to correct the mistake. So, they didn't ship our items until Tuesday and then they forgot to ship them via air freight. We ended up receiving them an entire week late. We asked for a credit, but they refused. Since then, we haven't had a problem, though." (This should give you concern)

BUYER: "What are some things you wish the vendor would do differently?"

REFERENCE: "I wish they would provide me with delivery status hourly by text message because one of my other vendors in another industry does that. They assured me that they have taken my request and put it in queue to be added to their capabilities with their next system upgrade, but that won't happen for another six months." (This should give you comfort)

REFERENCE: "We love their quality and their service, but I really wish they would get their shipping operations organized. Every month or so, we get another of their customers' shipments and they get ours. It's only caused us a production line shutdown one time, but we have to keep extra inventory in case it happens again. But every time they've said that they've identified and solved the problem, it inevitably seems like this 'switcharoo' happens the next week." (This should give you concern)

Would you care to share stories of reference check calls you've done - both good and bad? Just click the Comments link below!

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Friday, October 15, 2010

Procurement Professionals: Who Is Coming For YOUR Job?

In my line of work, I get to observe a lot of changes that affect the procurement profession. And I've noticed a certain trend developing lately.

While we have provided our training to both individual procurement professionals and corporate groups for 10 years and we continue to do so at a growing rate, I am noticing something a little different this year. This year, we are seeing a lot of students who have not been in procurement enrolling in our training because they want to get into procurement.

While certainly someone with no procurement experience and little leadership experience is not an immediate threat to unseat a CPO at a Fortune 500 company, procurement professionals closer to the entry level might not be as safe. Macro-economic changes, such as the emergence from the recent recession, bring about restructuring.

"Restructuring" doesn't always mean downsizing. It means taking some people out and bringing other people in. Or, to paraphrase Jim Collins, "getting the right people on the bus and then getting the right people in the right seats." If a company is positioning itself to get back into growth mode, surely they will be reevaluating whether they have the right talent to support growth.

As long as you've kept your skills sharp and stayed up to date with the latest trends, techniques, and technologies in procurement, you should be able to stay where you're at. But if you've let your skills and knowledge of modern procurement (and, by modern, I mean familiar with current practices of the past year, not the last five years) wither on the vine, someone is likely champing at the bit to unseat you.

What are the warning signs that you've let your skills wither on the vine? How about these:
  • You've felt you've had to work harder because you were kept employed to do your work plus the work of others who were let go and, therefore, hadn't had time for training
  • You've deferred your career development to your employer who slashed the training budget
  • You've just been lazy and thought you'd be certified when you got around to it

If one or more of these items applies to you, you're not the only one. But the big question is: what are you going to do about it now that you know that the skill levels of the people gunning for your job aren't remaining idle?

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Thursday, October 14, 2010

Revised Purchasing Certification Requirements

I wanted to advise you of an important change in the purchasing profession. The requirements for earning the prestigious SPSM® Certification have been slightly modified. And, now, the SPSM Certification will represent even greater negotiation skills for those who earn it!

Today, Next Level Purchasing has made a noteworthy change to the SPSM and SPSM2 Certification requirements. The online course "Powerful Negotiation For Successful Buying" has replaced "Microsoft Project For Purchasing Professionals" as a requirement for SPSM Certification. The new requirements for SPSM Certification are:

Step #1: Complete the six highly personal and interactive online classes of the Senior Professional in Supply Management Program. You earn 44 Continuing Education Hours (CEH's) by successfully completing the following online classes, in this order:

Step #2: Pass the SPSM Exam. This online exam consists of 90 challenging questions covering material from the six aforementioned online classes. These questions comprehensively test your ability to apply skills to situations that you may face in your purchasing job. And, again, you take it online meaning that you DO NOT have to travel to a testing facility. You can take the exam from anywhere that you have access to a computer connected to the Internet.

Step #3: Submit Your SPSM Certification Application.

In addition to this change, Next Level Purchasing has also greatly expanded the material in Microsoft Project For Purchasing Professionals in creating the new online course "Professional Purchasing Project Management." Going well beyond just teaching you how to use project management software, Professional Purchasing Project Management now teaches you everything you need to know to successfully manage modern purchasing projects.

Completing Professional Purchasing Project Management is now required to earn the SPSM2 Certification. The new requirements for SPSM2 Certification are:

Step #1: Earn the SPSM Certification. The SPSM2 an even higher level of achievement than the SPSM Certification. Similar to a master's degree being a higher level compared to a bachelor's degree, the SPSM2 will be an indication of your continued dedication to advancing your career. The SPSM2 Certification builds on the skills and knowledge that you have already acquired while earning the prerequisite SPSM Certification and adds training focused on the advanced skills of management and international procurement.

Step #2: Complete the four highly personal and interactive online classes of the SPSM2 Program. You earn 32 Continuing Education Hours (CEH's) by successfully completing the following online classes, in this order:

Step #3: Take the SPSM2 Exam. This online exam consists of 60 challenging questions covering material from the four aforementioned online classes. These questions comprehensively test your ability to apply skills to situations that you may face in your purchasing job. And, again, you take it online meaning that you DO NOT have to travel to a testing facility. You can take the exam from anywhere that you have access to a computer connected to the Internet.

Step #4: Submit Your SPSM2 Certification Application.

We believe that purchasing professionals like you will be tremendously excited about these changes. First, you can now pursue the prestigious SPSM Certification while simultaneously getting extensive training in negotiation – one of the most highly valued skills! Second, you now have a way of comprehensively learning project management as it applies to the purchasing field.

If you haven't gotten started on enhancing your career by earning the SPSM Certification, now is the time to do so! For more information about earning your SPSM Certification, go to http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com/spsm.html.

If you have already earned or begun working towards the SPSM Certification, you have been sent an earlier message about being "grandfathered" into the old requirements. Being grandfathered means that you do not have to do any additional work to earn your SPSM or SPSM2 Certification. What you have already accomplished still counts! If you missed that email, please contact Next LevelPurchasing at help@nextlevelpurchasing.com to update your email address. You can also read more about how "grandfathering" works at http://www.nextlevelpurchasing.com/grandfather.html.

If you have been waiting to learn effective purchasing project management techniques but just needed the right class to come along, learn more about Professional Purchasing Project Management at http://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com/purchasing-class.php.

If you have any questions about these new requirements, please send an email to help@nextlevelpurchasing.com.

Thank you for your interest in letting Next Level Purchasing help you have a rewarding career.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
http://www.nextlevelpurchasing.com/

Monday, October 11, 2010

A Correlation Between Failed Employees & Inadequate Training?

A weekly article that I never fail to miss is "The American Entrepreneur" by Ron Morris. I have always found his articles so "real world" that, if I don't already relate to the situations described, I feel that I better pay attention because I likely will in the future.

Ron's most recent article, "Badges," talks about three of the most difficult situations a manager faces. The third situation is the process of firing an employee.

While the termination of an employee is usually perceived as an indictment of that employee's performance, Ron sees two sides of the firing coin. He writes "Never forget that your termination of an individual is at least 50% your fault. You mis-hired in the first place. You didn’t use the modern tools (Wonderlic, Predictive Index, behavioral interviewing) and you probably, somewhere along the way, took a shortcut. And, of course, you may have skipped a step or two in training. So many failed employees end up on the scrap pile because they were poorly trained or not trained at all."

In my line of work, I see all sorts of perceptions of training. Some companies view it as a critical piece of their strategic plan to achieve significant improvement. Others treat it less seriously.

But, when training might make the difference between enjoying an employee's long-term contributions to success and the terrifying process of firing an employee - in the article, Ron describes a situation where a terminated employee threatened to be "back with his M-16" - it seems like a worthwhile thing to focus on, don't you think?

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Friday, October 08, 2010

Supplier Financial Health Evaluation: How To Avoid An "Epic Fail!"

Ever since launching our online two-course series "Finance For Strategic Procurement," I've had many practitioners approach me about the topic and its importance in today's modern procurement world. This week, I separately met with executives at two totally unrelated companies who learned from me that they were making the same mistake.

What was that mistake?

Well, it relates to the evaluation of supplier financial health. I introduced them to four methods of evaluating supplier financial health. One of those methods involved using the Altman Z-Score.

Have you ever heard the phrase "I know enough about it to be dangerous?"

Well, that applied in both of these situations.

You see, the Altman Z-Score calculation has three variations: one used for publicly-held manufacturers, one used for privately-held manufacturers, and one used for non-manufacturers. Each Z-Score calculation is performed using slightly different coefficients and variables to arrive at a number used to compare against a scale that determines the financial health of the supplier.

Well, not only is the calculation different for each of the different variations, but the scale against which a supplier's Z-Score is compared is different for each variation. So, beyond just using the wrong calculation, by using the wrong variation, you could be getting a totally opposite reading on the financial health of a supplier!

For example, let's say you calculated the Z-Score for a publicly-held manufacturer as 1.7. But let's also say that you used the comparison scale of the variation for non-manufacturers.

The comparison scale of the variation for non-manufacturers indicates that a 1.7 puts the supplier right in the middle of the "grey zone." This means that there is not a severe likelihood of imminent bankruptcy.

But what does the comparison scale for the publicly-held manufacturer variation - the correct variation, in this case - say?

It says that a score of 1.7 puts the supplier in the lowest category, meaning bankruptcy has a high likelihood. If you don't apply the right variation to the type of supplier you are evaluating, the Altman Z-Score will not work!

Obviously, Finance For Strategic Procurement (Part II, specifically) covers how to correctly apply the Altman Z-Score for each type of supplier. Though I know that not enough procurement professionals utilize the excellent tool that the Altman Z-Score is, I didn't realize that applying the wrong variation appears to be a very common mistake among those that do attempt to utilize it.

Perhaps that's what happens when googling is used instead of getting authoritative purchasing training: learning enough to be dangerous. And, make no mistake, miscategorizing a healthy supplier as a financially distressed supplier or failing to recognize a supplier's impending bankruptcy are both dangerous procurement mistakes.

"Epic fail" kind of mistakes.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Thursday, October 07, 2010

What Products & Services Are Going To Cost More Soon?

Although it was aimed at consumers, Comcast featured a slideshow on their site entitled "8 Things You'll Be Paying More For Soon" that contained some concepts applicable to corporate procurement as well. For example, though most of you may not be placing purchase orders for basketball tickets, categories like airline travel, health insurance, and cotton products (e.g., uniforms) are certainly within the jurisdiction of corporate procurement teams.

But moreso than knowing price predictions for specific categories, the slideshow includes the type of insights into the cost driving factors for these categories that procurement professionals should consider for the goods and services that they buy. These factors include:

  • Impact of weather on supply/demand/cost
  • Impact of politics on supply/demand/cost
  • Direction of key indices, such as the PPI
  • Impact of market trading in addition to the fundamentals
  • Changes in inventory levels in the supply chain

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

Procurement-Finance Collaboration

I hope that you have enjoyed the article "How Procurement & Finance Can Collaborate."

One of the keys to facilitating good procurement-finance collaboration is to "speak the same language" - using the same terms to describe finance-related things. I always reference the use of "cost avoidance" as an example to illustrate the differences in terminology used by procurement folks and finance folks.

In procurement, the term "cost avoidance" is used all the time. But I've never heard a CFO say "cost avoidance" on an earnings call with investors.

Do you think that there is a clue in that?

I do.

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

Friday, October 01, 2010

Investment Flows To Supply Chain Technology Vendors: Who's Next?

Wow. On this first day of October, I reflect on September and am a little amazed by the changes in ownership at some of the supply chain technology vendors in the last month.

In case you missed it, here is a quick synopsis of a few deals that happened in the past few weeks:

September 24 - SciQuest goes public

September 27 - HighJump Software agrees to acquire TrueCommerce

September 27 - Madison Dearborn Partners agrees to acquire stake in Fieldglass

Mergers and acquisitions and initial public offerings within a certain vertical are often part of a trend that ripples on for some time. With three big events in a span of four days, it is looking like the beginning of a trend here.

So, the question is: which supply chain technology vendor is next?

To Your Career,
Charles Dominick, SPSM
President & Chief Procurement Officer
Next Level Purchasing, Inc.
Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?
Earn Your SPSM® Certification Online At
Next Level Purchasing . com

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